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Waste Disposal Testing

Kiwa CMT advises on the characterisation and WAC (Waste Acceptance Criteria) governing the offsite disposal of waste or contaminated materials such as soil, ‘made ground’ and waste that will be tested for a range of standard contaminants (including TPH i.e. oils, fuels etc) in accordance with EU landfill regulations (Landfill (England and Wales) Regulations 2002).
We provide technical advice, guidance and support throughout the process, resulting in the safe, most efficient and cost-effective offsite disposal of a range of material.

We are a UKAS accredited testing laboratory (No.0529) for this scope of accreditations.

Waste Characterisation

European legislation EN 14473/02 specifies the criteria and procedures for acceptance of waste at landfills pursuant to Article 16 and Annex II of Directive 1999/31/EC (“Landfill Directive”). This is to determine whether waste is hazardous or non-hazardous.

Basic Characteristics

This is the first step in acceptance procedure and constitutes a full characterisation of the waste to gather information for safe disposal. Basic characterisation is required for each type of waste and the requirements for this are:
• Source and origin of waste;
• Information on the process producing the waste;
• Description of the waste treatment applied or a statement of reasons why treatment is not considered necessary;
• Data on the composition of the waste and leaching behaviour where relevant;
• Appearance;
• Code in accordance with the European Waste List;
• Relevant hazard properties according to Annex III of the Directive 91/689/EEC;
• Information to prove the waste may be accepted;
• Additional precautions to be taken at the site if necessary;
• Check if waste can be recycled.

Waste Acceptance Criteria

Waste materials fall into three categories. These are fully defined within the legislation and are:

  • Inert waste
  • Non hazardous waste – e.g. food processing effluent, landfill leachate, street cleaning residues
  • Hazardous waste – shows one or more of 14 hazards (e.g. flammable, toxic, corrosive, etc.) that are defined in WM3

Directives and guidance are available from the Environment Agency
Each waste category has leaching limit value criteria for acceptance of a waste material at the relevant landfill site. Legislation has changed and as from 30 October 2007 there are tighter restrictions on Waste Acceptance – i.e. non-hazardous landfills will only accept treated solid and treated liquid wastes.

Each waste category has leaching limit value criteria for acceptance of a waste material at the relevant landfill site. Legislation has changed and as from 30 October 2007 there are tighter restrictions on Waste Acceptance – i.e. non-hazardous landfills will only accept treated solid and treated liquid wastes.

What is a treated waste?

A treated waste is one that has had one or more of the following:

  • Physical separation
  • Chemical process
  • Thermal process
  • Biological process


And the above process must change the characteristics of the waste in a way that can:

  • Reduce its’ volume
  • Reduce the hazardous nature
  • Facilitate its’ handling
  • Enhance its’ recovery

For non-hazardous wastes the hazardous nature cannot be reduced. 
The chemistry department will provide the necessary guidance and support to achieve the safe disposal of waste to the appropriate facility via the most efficient and cost effective route. 
Liquid Wastes are banned from Landfill as from 30 October 2007. A liquid is defined as a free flowing substance with specific rheomorphology and is separate from sludge.

Here is our WRAP Re-use of Waste Datasheet.